Dear sister, brother, uncle, aunt, father, mother, friend

I am writing to you who I feel connected to. Because just like my parents, you decided to leave your home country and look for job opportunities in a foreign country. And why did you decide to do this? Because your home country could never offer your children — the next generation — access to education, health, and even wealth, like you imagined in a more developed country.

 

Through the eyes of my parents, I can really imagine the pain you must have felt when you left your parents and siblings behind, your comfort zone, maybe even the love of your life.

 

Your journey has been hard from the start, you crossed borders, you experienced joy and sadness along the way, and you might even be feeling homesick until this very moment. But you did it. You provided a more aspiring future for your children, and soon enough they will be the greatest reward you could imagine. They will be able to take you on trips back to home, maybe even help you build a house.

I know it has been hard, and it still is. I know you have truly suffered in ways I could never imagine. I hope that my grateful letter enables me to show you the other side. The way your children feel about your brave decision, and how thankful we are.

I have not even touched upon the more ‘difficult’ issues. I know that next to mental challenges, there must have been many physical challenges as well. I hope that this letter will be one of the steps for me towards helping you, and making your — already very hard — decision easier to pursue.

 

Please hang in there, for I am sure better days will come.

 

All the best,

Kristen

This letter was written by a member of ASEAN Youth Organization

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